Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> ABC News's David Muir traveled to Somaliland, one of four ravaged countries. Along with South Sudan, Yemen and Nigeria, the four countries have an estimated 20 million people at risk of famine.</p>
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> In Somalia, nearly 200,000 children are at imminent risk of death from starvation.</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> In drought-stricken Somaliland, adults and children alike line up to collect water in plastic containers. The water is often trucked in from hours away, but the lines for it form early.</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> Somaliland has seen devastating conditions this year after several years of failed rains. To get water, mothers and children must wait for it to be trucked into their villages.&nbsp;</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> About 22 million children are experiencing hunger, disease and thirst in the four famine countries. Muir saw this first-hand at Boroma Hospital, where people from all over Somaliland flock to get help.</p>
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • Children who don't reach the main hospitals are likely to die. The United Nations has estimated that half a million children will suffer acute malnutrition in the country this year.&nbsp;
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> This is Hamda. She is 19 months old and weighs only 11 pounds, half of what she is supposed to weigh. She has been undergoing treatment for more than 19 days.&nbsp;</p>
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> This woman has seven children and struggles every day, worrying about providing food for her family. She told Muir she has to be both mother and father to her children.&nbsp;</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> More than 35,000 children suffering from severe malnutrition were treated at nutrition centers across Somalia the first two months of the year, a sharp increase from the same time period in 2016, according to UNICEF. Many others have died in remote villages across the country, humanitarian agencies report.</p>
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> In February, UNICEF projected that nearly a million children would be acutely malnourished in 2017, a fifth of which need urgent support.&nbsp;</p>
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> As famine looms again over Somalia, UNICEF reports an increasing number of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition and cholera &ndash; a combination that killed many children in the famine of 2011.</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> Muir was on the ground in Somaliland with Save the Children&rsquo;s CEO Carolyn Miles, following the organization&rsquo;s efforts to bring health care and aid to the remote regions of the country.&nbsp;</p>
    CHRISTINE ROMO/ABC News
  • <p> Muir met these children at a mobile clinic in East Somaliland. Save the Children has deployed emergency health units in the country, providing community health to some of the areas hit hardest by the drought.</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> Families have to walk for miles, sometimes hours, to find water and help. Outbreaks of cholera are being reported where water points are becoming polluted or insanitary.</p>
    Christine Romo/ABC News
  • <p> Save the Children has reached close to 100,000 kids in need.&nbsp;</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> Mobile clinics help provide care for malnourished children and curb the spread of diseases such as cholera and pneumonia.&nbsp;</p>
    ABC News
  • <p> Muir and Save the Children&rsquo;s CEO Carolyn Miles visited mobile clinics in some of the most remote areas of the region. The organization aims to help about 2.5 million children and adults at risk by deploying mobile clinics across the country.&nbsp;</p>
    ABC News
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